Connect with us

Odd

French Hiker Finds Century Old Pigeon Message from World War One

Published

on

  • Think your friends take a long to respond? Try telling that to the writer of this message.

You know that annoying feeling when you send someone a message and never hear back? Of course you do. It’s even worse if you’re using a messaging service that doesn’t tell you whether the message went through.

You’re stuck in a limbo, left wondering if the addressee just didn’t bother replying, or ever even received your message. How long would you be willing to wait for a response?

A day? A week? Or maybe more than 100 years?

That is how long a particular German soldier has been waiting to hear back on a message he sent. We know this, because the undelivered World War One-era note just recently surfaced in France.

When we say surfaced, we mean it literally. A couple unearthed its container while hiking on a field between the towns of Ingersheim and Sigolsheim in northeastern France.

It’s no wonder the German soldier’s note got lost, though. While even modern messaging apps sometimes lose messages, he used something much more unreliable.

Namely, a carrier pigeon.

A Hike to Remember

The message, held within a two-inch long metal cylinder, was described as “super rare” by Dominique Jardy, curator of the Linge Musem near the site of discovery.

“When this object was described to me, I was excited like a madman. It is my first time seeing something like this,” Jardy told the French DNA news site.

But Jardy wasn’t the one who found the message capsule. That honor goes to Jade Halaoui.

As we mentioned, Halaoui was hiking on what a 100 years ago was a raging battlefield. Within the lush green grass of the field, he spotted a small, shiny metal object.

Realizing that the cylinder was hollow, Haloui decided to take a peek at the contents.

“I dug it up and cut it open to see what was inside,” he told DNA.

Out came a small sheet of paper. On it, someone had scrawled text that neither Haloui nor his partner Juliette could read.

Not only were the note’s pencil marking worn with age. The language was also utterly incomprehensible to the couple.

At Juliette’s suggestion, they took the capsule and the message to the Linge Museum. Both Halaoui and Juliette understood they’d found something remarkable as the volunteer at the museum reception called Jardy as soon as they laid eyes upon the message.

Decoding the Message

It was no wonder that Halaoui nor his partner could read the message. Even if the writing had been legible, it was written in Sütterlinschrift, an old form of German cursive writing.

Even Jardy couldn’t decipher the message and had to enlist a German-speaking friend to help him. While we’ve said the note and writing were worn, Jardy pointed out that the paper is in excellent condition for being nearly 110 years old.

Finally, Jardy and his friend were able to translate the message into French. On it, the unknown author gives a grim report of his situation.

“Platoon Potthof receives fire as they reach the western border of the parade ground, platoon Potthof takes up fire and retreats after a while,” the message reads according to The Guardian.

“In Fechtwald half a platoon was disabled. Platoon Potthof retreats with heavy losses.”

It seems that platoon Potthof’s situation was desperate. According to Jardy, notes on the paper show that four pigeons had already been sent off with an identical message.

It’s impossible to know whether any of the messenger pigeons made it to the intended recipient. This one definitely lost its cargo.

The Unknown Soldier

That being said, we don’t know whether the author had time to get frustrated with the failed delivery. The message does not give his name, and considering the brutality of WWI, he may not have lived to read any possible reply.

But Jardy is determined to discover who the author of the message is. While he is not named, the message does list his unit – the 9th company of the 171st Prussian infantry regiment.

The name of his platoon – Potthof – also most likely corresponds with the name of its commanding officer. That could give further clues to the author’s identity.

“It will definitely be necessary to search through the archives of this unit,” Jardy says.

On Wings of Glory

Platoon Potthof’s the only avian that participated in WWI. It is estimated that around 300,000 pigeons were used to deliver messages by the armies participating in the conflict.

Of course, they had more practical means of communication at their disposal. The telephone existed, and optic signals and runners were also in wide use.

Each of these came with their own problems, though. The constant artillery bombardments that became a hallmark of WWI often destroyed phone lines. Yeah, phones used to require physical cables.

Optic signals were easy to miss, either because it was raining water or hot lead. Runners also ran a high risk of being killed by enemy soldiers before delivering their message.

In this context, pigeons were actually surprisingly reliable. One of the most famous examples of a heroic pigeon is a bird known as Cher Ami.

On October 3, 1918, Cher Ami flew through German fire to deliver a message requesting for Allied forces to save an encircled American battalion. She sustained horrendous injuries during her ordeal – she was shot through the chest, blinded in one eye, and had one of her legs blown off so that it was only hanging on by a tendon.

Despite her wounds, Cher Ami delivered the request for help. For her deeds, she received the Croix de Guerre, a French medal of military honor.

Perhaps the Potthof pigeon attempted a similar gallant deed and fell in service of its country. Or maybe it got lost and pecked off the message container. We’ll never know.



Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Odd

Ultraconservative EU Politician Resigns After Breaking COVID Laws by Attending 25-Man Orgy

Published

on

  • Whoever said that politics are boring?

“Practice what you preach” is generally a pretty good guideline for going through life. If you start telling other people what they should do, it’s only right that you yourself abide by the same rules. Right?

Well, we all know that all too often it doesn’t work that way. It’s easy to dictate other people’s lives, but we as people seem pretty comfortable with giving ourselves a break.

One arena where this is particularly prevalent seems to be politics. Maybe it’s because politicians are constantly in the public spotlight, but decision makers across the aisle often seem to relax their standards when it comes to their own lives.

A great example of such a case unfolded recently in the European Union. At the eye of the storm is the Hungarian Member of the European Parliament (MEP) Jozsef Szajer.

MEP Szajer was recently busted skirting COVID-19 laws restricting the number of people at gatherings. And he did it by attending a 25-man “sex party”.

Szajer – a married man with a daughter – is a founding member of the hardline Fidesz party. The party currently holds power in Hungary with Prime Minister Viktor Orban at its helm.

Fidesz has gained notoriety for its extremely conservative politics, including such things as “defending the sanctity of marriage”. Prime Minister Orban in particular is known as a firebrand, often railing against the more liberal values of Western Europe and the EU.

You’d then imagine that Mr. Szajer would subscribe to some rigorous moral standards.

Yeah, you’d really think that, wouldn’t you?

“The parliament is now in session!”

‘Fleeing Along the Gutter’

It’s bad enough for Szajer to be caught red-handed like this, but he didn’t even do it with dignity. The whole thing started on November 27 when Belgian police received several noise complaints about a party.

The complaints concerned a second-floor apartment in Brussels, where European Parliament’s committee meetings are primarily held. As a result, the cops decided to give the partygoers a surprise visit.

And what a scene it was that awaited them. According to Fox News, the police found a full-blown orgy in action, with 25 mostly naked men in attendance.

When the officers started marching in through the door, one of the men decided to make a break for it. With a backpack on him, he climbed out of the second-story apartment’s window and jumped down to the street.

Sarah Durant, spokesperson for Brussels’ deputy public prosecutor, said that shortly afterwards, a passerby saw the man “fleeing along the gutter”.

“The man’s hands were bloody. It is possible that he may have been injured while fleeing,” Durant told The Guardian.

“Narcotics were found in his backpack,” she added.

When detained, the man was unable to produce any identity documents. So, the police cordially escorted him to his residence, where he identified himself as – surprise, surprise – MEP Jozsef Szajer with a diplomatic passport.

With the same breath, the now-uncovered Szajer claimed diplomatic immunity. And so, he got off with a stern warning, despite blatantly violating Belgium’s COVID restrictions.

Regret and Apologies

He may have slipped through the hands of the police, but Szajer didn’t escape completely without consequence. Two days later, on Sunday, November 29, he resigned from his position as an MEP.

Still two days later, on Tuesday, December 1, Szajer released a public statement. In it, he admitted that he had indeed attended the “house party” in question and apologized for his “irresponsible” behavior.

“I deeply regret violating the COVID restrictions – it was irresponsible on my part. I am ready to pay the fine that occurs. With my resignation on Sunday I drew the political and personal consequences,” Szajer said according to The Guardian.

“I apologise to my family, to my colleagues, to my voters. I ask them to evaluate my misstep against a background of 30 years of devoted and hard work. The misstep is strictly personal,” he added.

As to the drugs that were found in his possession, Szajer played the age-old card of claiming to not know where they came from.

“I did not use drugs. I offered to the police to take an instant test, but they did not do it. Police said an ecstasy pill was found. It’s not mine, I don’t know who placed it and how,” he stated.

You can decide for yourself what you think of Szajer’s statement. We’re just saying, we feel like we’ve heard these same lines before.

Party Leader: ‘Not Cool, Man’

It’s too early to say whether his little late-night romp will be the end of his political career. It’s not making him any friends in high places, though.

Hungary’s Prime Minister Orban himself rebuked Szajer in a statement on December 20. Orban said that Szajer’s actions had “no place in the values of our political family”.

“We will not forget nor repudiate his 30 years of work, but his deed is unacceptable and indefensible,” Orban told reporters.

Commenting on Szajer’s decision to resign, Orban said he had made the “only right decision”.

“We acknowledge his decision, just as we acknowledge that he has apologized to his family, his political community and to the voters,” said Orban.

The European Parliament also chastised Szajer, though not quite as harshly as Orban.

“There is nothing wrong to participate in a sex party of any kind. However, such kinds of meetings with many people are illegal under the coronavirus laws,” an unidentified source at the Parliament told The Guardian.

“The fact of being covered by parliamentary immunity does not exempt anyone from obeying the law.”

While the police can’t prosecute Szajer at the moment, his diplomatic immunity will drop on January 1. After that, he might be facing a fine of roughly $300 for violating coronavirus laws, in addition to any possible drug charges.

In all fairness, Szajer apparently wasn’t the only politician present at the orgy. According to The Guardian, two other men busted at the party also claimed diplomatic immunity.

Still, Szajer’s claim to fame was that he masterminded the 2011 Hungarian constitution, restricting marriage to be between a man and a woman. Against that backdrop, getting arrested at a gay orgy is not a great look for him.

Naughty, naughty.



Source link

Continue Reading

Odd

Try Solving this 100-Year Old Puzzle

Published

on

  • Only two people have solved the 1934 literary puzzle, and the correct answer has never been printed.

Are you spending the holidays alone this year? Good for you; you’re keeping yourself and your loved ones safe and preventing dangerous overcrowding of the hospitals following holiday gatherings. It’s understandable if you’re a little anxious, looking at all that time off work, hanging out alone. Netflix is churning out holiday movies like it’s their job, but you’re not alone if you binged all you could binge of streaming services during the first half of the year. 

Puzzles will at least keep your mind sharp.

Well, maybe it’s time to get a little old-fashioned with how you spend your time. Jigsaw puzzles soared in popularity during lockdowns, which is nice for them; they were about due for a win. But if you’re looking for something a little more challenging, I present to you Cain’s Jawbone

The puzzle takes the form of a 100-page murder-mystery novel. The puzzle’s premise is the novel manuscript got shuffled on the way to the publisher who printed the book out of order. It’s up to the reader to put the pages back in the correct order. 

 

While the puzzle sounds a bit like a choose-your-own-adventure for adults, only two people have solved it in the past 100 years. Cain’s Jawbone is a genuine mystery, written in formal English, with plenty of misdirections and red herrings when it’s placed in the right order. Out of order, it’s one of the most challenging literary puzzles out there. 

Its author was Edward Powys Mathers, who not only wrote a mystery novel but wrote one so challenging that it’s a viable puzzle. He was one of the forefathers of cryptic crossword puzzles, a poet, and a translator. Under the pseudonym Torquemada, he created puzzles for The Observer in the UK and reviewed detective stories. 

 

The last printing of Cain’s Jawbone sold out at Unbound. However, you can find some overpriced copies on eBay if you’re really hard up for holiday activities. It’s worth keeping an eye out for a reprint. The puzzle keeps just fine, so you can pull it out at Christmas every year and add a little murder detective work to your holiday traditions.



Source link

Continue Reading

Odd

Apple I Computer in Original Box Signed by Steve Wozniak Goes on Auction

Published

on

  • If you’ve ever wanted to own a relic of modern history, here’s a pretty good one to go for.

Apple or PC, that is the question. There have been entire marketing campaigns built around the rivalry, but let us be diplomatic here and say both kinds of computers have their uses.

No matter which can you’re in, though, it’d be hard to deny that Apple computers have shaped the way we think about personal computers in significant ways. Many of such basic things as a graphical user interface were popularized – if not necessarily invented – by Apple.

It’s no wonder then, that Apple has built the kind of cult following that the company still has. Many of its early machines are masterpieces of popularly available computer technology of their time.

But these are old, old computers and exceedingly rare. If you happen to collect for whatever reason, finding one can be hard – and best not to talk about whether the thing will be in working condition.

Now, though, RR Auction has available a thing so rare you wouldn’t even think it exists. We’re talking about the original, the one and only Apple I computer, and you can make a bid to buy it.

Or you can try, if you have $50,000 lying around that you don’t need. And that’s just the starting price, so you’ll probably have to dig a lot deeper.

For example, in 2019, another Apple I unit sold for $470,000. But there’s a good reason why this one might go for even more.

That’s a bit of a mark-up from the original price of $666.66.

Photos courtesy of RR Auction.

A Functional Fossil

You might be wondering why anyone would part with tens of thousands of dollars of hard earned cash for an antiquated computer. This is not just any old Apple I we’re talking about here, though.

To begin with, this thing actually works. It was manufactured in 1976, and it’s still in working order.

Or, well, it’s been returned to functionality, we should say.

“This Apple I computer was restored to its original, operational state in September 2020 by Apple I expert Corey Cohen,” says RR Auction on its website.

“The system was operated without fault for approximately eight hours in a comprehensive test.”

But so what? It’s still just an old computer, right? If you still think that, you’re not quite grasping just how rare the Apple I is.

Apple – still just a tiny three-man startup operating out of the garage of Jobs’ parents in 1976 – only ever made 200 of these computers. Out of that batch, 175 were sold.

So, to even find one anymore is a real challenge. But for the computer to be actually functional?

Let’s just say that by all probability, this thing should not be.

A Box! A Box!

Oh, but it gets even better. The lucky winner of the auction won’t just get the original Apple I motherboard.

No, they will get the whole shebang, everything you need to get the most out of an ancient computer. In addition to the Apple I unit itself, the auction includes original manuals, the Apple Cassette Interface, a power supply, a vintage Datanetics keyboard (in an age-old wooden case), a 1976 Sayo monitor, and another cassette player by Panasonic.

Yeah, about those cassette players. Computer programs used to come on cassettes. Man, this thing is old.

To quote the late Billy Mays, though, there’s more. The cherry on the top of this computer history cake is that it comes in its original packaging.

It might seem to like just an old cardboard box. If you like collecting old stuff, though, you’ll know that having them in the original shipping box can make this stupidly valuable.

But wait, says the ghost of Billy Mays, there’s even more! The box is signed by Steve Wozniak, the man who built the Apple I computers with his own hands in that tiny California garage.

If you’re looking to own a piece of personal computing history, it doesn’t get much better than this.

It Belongs in a Museum

And what a piece of computing history it is. Apple was the world’s most valuable company between 2012 and 2018, and still is the biggest tech company in the world. And it all started with this thing.

“The Apple I is not only a marvel of early computing ingenuity, but the product that launched what is today one of the most valuable and successful companies in the world,” says RR Auction.

But still, we are talking about history. The Apple I is old, almost prehistoric when comparing it to modern computers.

To begin with, if you had bought one of these boxes in 1976, you wouldn’t have gotten a computer as you might think of it today. All you got was a caseless motherboard.

Apple never even manufactured a case. You would have to house the motherboard in whatever box you had available. Briefcases were apparently a popular option.

Still, Apple I was ahead of its competition at the time. All you needed to use it was a keyboard and TV to act as a display. Other computers required extensive programming and additional hardware to even put out text.

The relative simplicity caught the eyes of investors, and just a year later the Apple II came out. That one resembled a modern computer a lot more, and set Apple on the path that would eventually lead to the Macintosh, the iPad, and the iPhone.

That’s a whole other story, though. But if you have a few hundred grand burning a hole in your pocket, you might as well try bidding for the first chapter of that story.



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending