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Exposure to iodine in the NICU may affect infant thyroid function

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Exposure to iodine in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) may increase a baby’s risk for loss of thyroid function, a new study suggests.

Iodine solutions are often used as disinfectants on the skin before surgical or other medical procedures. Iodine also is given internally for imaging procedures used in infants, researchers explained.

Investigators found higher blood levels of iodine in babies with congenital hypothyroidism (partial or total loss of thyroid function) who had a stay in the NICU. All these infants had normal thyroid function when they went to the NICU.

“Limiting iodine exposure among this group of infants whenever possible may help lower the risk of losing thyroid function,” researcher Dr. James Mills said in a news release from the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

Mills is from the epidemiology branch of the NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

For babies with congenital hypothyroidism, treatment with thyroid hormone has to start within four weeks after birth or permanent intellectual disability can happen.

For the study, Mills and his colleagues compared iodine levels from more than 900 children with congenital hypothyroidism to more than 900 children who did not have the condition.

Among the kids, 183 were cared for in the NICU. Of these, 114 had congenital hypothyroidism and 69 did not.

Children with congenital hypothyroidism were more likely to have been in a NICU than those without the condition, the researchers found.

When they looked at only kids who had been in the NICU, they found those with congenital hypothyroidism had higher iodine levels than those without the condition.

Higher iodine levels among babies with congenital hypothyroidism and a NICU stay might be linked to exposure to iodine during treatment, although only an association was observed and the research didn’t include information on the infants’ exact medical procedures.

The researchers caution NICU staff not to use disinfectants containing iodine and to avoid exposing babies to iodine unless necessary. Preemie infants absorb iodine more readily through their skin than older infants, they noted.

The report was published July 7 in the Journal of Nutrition.

More information

For more on congenital hypothyroidism, head to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Copyright 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.



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Study: People in U.S. exercising more, but less intensely, during pandemic

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In the face of pandemic-mandated gym closings and significant limits on movement outside the home, a new survey suggests that Americans are spending more time exercising while dialing back the intensity of their workouts.

The survey of nearly 900 Americans across the country, conducted between May and June, used as its benchmark World Health Organization recommendations that all adults between 18 and 64 get a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise a week.

“The COVID-19 restrictions imposed early in the pandemic created a unique, unprecedented environment, including restricted access to resources and, in some cases, increased unstructured time,” said study author Mary Stenson.

“We were curious how these changes might impact physical activity patterns in the U.S. during the shutdowns, but also if these shifts would remain in the long term,” said Stenson, an associate professor of exercise science and sport studies at College of Saint Benedict/Saint John’s University in St. Joseph, Minn.

In Stenson’s study, more than 85% of those polled were women and nearly 90% were white, with an average age of almost 39.

The findings: By June, just over 60% of those surveyed said they were meeting the WHO threshold, representing a nearly 8% jump from pre-pandemic routines.

Investigators also found a more than 11% jump in the number of people who were actually exceeding that threshold.

The number of days per week spent exercising also went up notably, from 3.75 days to more than 4.25 days.

Time spent per exercise session, however, stayed more or less stable, at just under an hour. And exercise intensity decreased “significantly,” the researchers found, with respondents attributing the drop to an inability to access gym equipment and classes and a shift to more outdoor walking.

“The increased activity and lower intensity were in line with what we expected,” said Stenson, who said the findings likely reflect the loss of performance “accountability” that comes with the cancellation of group exercise, organized sports and trainer sessions.

But Stenson said she was surprised by an additional observation that nearly three-quarters of those surveyed said they were likely or very likely to stick with their pandemic exercise habits post-pandemic.

And nearly 94% of those who had increased their activity levels since March said they planned to continue with their new routines over the coming year.

“We hope to find this is true next spring when we follow up,” said Stenson.

The plan is to re-survey the same people next June. In the meantime, she said her team is “hopeful that some individuals realized how much they can be active with limited resources, and that they will maintain their increased activity in the coming months.”

That thought was seconded by Dr. Beatrice Alexandra Golomb, a professor of medicine with the University of California San Diego’s School of Medicine.

“Fitness is tied to better health outcomes, and fewer COVID high-risk factors like hypertension [high blood pressure], obesity and diabetes,” said Golomb, who wasn’t part of the study. “Thus, exercise in the time of COVID remains important.”

“[And] it is a time of opportunity to discover new ways to exercise,” Golomb added. “There are a plethora of online exercise video options, possible parks or trails to investigate, and creative ways to repurpose your home or apartment. Chair, beds, the floor or vacuum cleaners can be conscripted for use. Remember: any movement is better than no movement.”

That becomes all the more important during a time of increased eating and sedentary behavior, said Lona Sandon, program director of the Department of Clinical Nutrition in the School of Health Professions at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.

“I know from my own experience,” said Sandon, who had no part in the study. “I sit more during the day when working at home. When I am in the office, I move around a lot more, get up out of my desk to talk to people at the other end of the hall, [and] run up the stairs to do something in the lab.”

And because what you eat is as important as exercise, Sandon has some advice: “Think realistically about calorie balance. We tend to underestimate the calories we eat and overestimate the calories we use. If over the past five or six months your clothes have been tightening, take a look at where you might be getting a few extra calories. Are you eating more desserts than you used too? Are you having a few more beers or glasses of wine? Or simply eating out of boredom or stress and depression?”

Stenson and her colleagues presented their findings last week at the virtual annual meeting of the American Physiological Society. Research presented at meetings are considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

There’s more information on the WHO exercise recommendations at World Health Organization.

Copyright 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.



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FDA issues emergency authorization for first at-home COVID-19 test

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Nov. 18 (UPI) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued an emergency authorization for the first rapid coronavirus test that can be administered at home.

The agency announced the authorization for the all-in-one test kit late Tuesday in response to a request by Kelly Lewis Brezoczky of Lucira Health, the California-based company that developed the test.

In a letter to Brezoczky, the FDA said the test meets the criteria for an emergency use authorization as there are no available alternatives and the product’s benefits outweigh its known and potential risks.

The test has been authorized for use with samples collected from the nasal cavity of those age 14 years and older whose doctors suspect they have been infected with the coronavirus. Use in doctor’s offices, hospitals, urgent care centers and emergency rooms has been approved for all ages.

While there have been other products approved for collecting samples at home, the Lucira product is the first to be fully self-administered and to provide results without a physician’s assistance.

The company’s website said the test is intended to cost under $50 and is designed to provide results within 30 minutes.

“Today’s authorization for a complete at-home test is a significant step toward FDA’s nationwide response to COVID-19,” Jeff Shuren, director of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said in a statement.

FDA Commissioner Stephen M. Hahn said the development of a COVID-19 test that can be administered outside a healthcare setting has been a major priority for the FDA, and now that there is one more people who suspect that they may have been infected with the virus can take immediate action to protect themselves and their community.

“We look forward to proactively working with test developers to support the availability of more at-home test options,” he said.

The FDA approval was issued as the nation deals with a growing widespread outbreak. According to data collected by Johns Hopkins University, the United States has recorded more than 150,000 case a day in five of the last six days.

The United States has reported more than 11.3 million infections and nearly 250,000 deaths, making it by far the sickest country to the pandemic.



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Antidepressant might help prevent severe COVID-19

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The antidepressant drug fluvoxamine — best known by the brand name Luvox — may help prevent serious illness in COVID-19 patients who aren’t yet hospitalized, a new study finds.

The study included 152 patients infected with mild-to-moderate COVID-19. Of those, 80 took fluvoxamine and 72 took a placebo for 15 days.

By the end of that time, none of the patients who took the drug had seen their infection progress to serious illness, compared with six (8.3%) of the patients who took the placebo, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

“The patients who took fluvoxamine did not develop serious breathing difficulties or require hospitalization for problems with lung function,” said first author Dr. Eric Lenze, professor of psychiatry.

“Most investigational treatments for COVID-19 have been aimed at the very sickest patients, but it’s also important to find therapies that prevent patients from getting sick enough to require supplemental oxygen or to have to go to the hospital. Our study suggests fluvoxamine may help fill that niche,” Lenze noted in a university news release.

Fluvoxamine — widely used to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder and social anxiety disorder — is a type of drug called a selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). This class of drugs also includes medicines such as Prozac, Zoloft and Celexa.

But unlike other SSRIs, fluvoxamine has a strong interaction with a protein called the sigma-1 receptor, which helps regulate the body’s inflammatory response.

“There are several ways this drug might work to help COVID-19 patients, but we think it most likely may be interacting with the sigma-1 receptor to reduce the production of inflammatory molecules,” explained study senior author Dr. Angela Reiersen, associate professor of psychiatry.

“Past research has demonstrated that fluvoxamine can reduce inflammation in animal models of sepsis, and it may be doing something similar in our patients,” she said in the release.

By reducing inflammation, fluvoxamine may prevent a hyperactive immune response in COVID-19 patients. That, in turn, may decrease their risk of serious illness and death, Reiersen said.

“Our goal is to help patients who are initially well enough to be at home and to prevent them from getting sick enough to be hospitalized,” Dr. Caline Mattar, assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases, said in the release. “What we’ve seen so far suggests that fluvoxamine may be an important tool in achieving that goal.”

Dr. Amesh Adalja is a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security in Baltimore. He wasn’t involved in the study, but said the research is “notable not only because of its positive outcome — we desperately need a medication that keeps COVID patients out of the hospital — but also because of the manner in which it was conducted.”

But Adalja stressed that a larger trial is needed “to see if the promising findings hold up.”

The researchers said they plan to begin such a study in the next few weeks and it will include patients from across the United States.

The preliminary study was published online Nov. 12 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

More information

For more on COVID-19, go to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

SOURCES: Amesh Adalja, M.D., senior scholar, Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, Baltimore; Washington University in St. Louis, news release, Nov. 12, 2020

Copyright 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.



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